non-verbal-communication-examples

Some studies show that up to 90 percent of communication is nonverbal. One’s body movements may contradict your words and others may easily spot it. Many expressions, gestures and other body movements seem to be universal across different countries and cultures. For example, a smile and an outstretched hand are usually used to show welcome and yawning at talk shows boredom. However, body language may also have some peculiarities and be different across the globe.

Here I will tell you about what movements with feet and legs may indicate in China.

According to Australian body language expert, Allan Pease, people usually start to unconsciously move their feet when lying. It is true for all ages and sexes.

However, in China this rule may not be applied in some situations. For instance, you will hardly see the Chinese doing that during business negotiations. This is because one’s feet are considered to be dirty in China and, therefore, you will always see your counterpart have their feet firmly on the floor during such meetings.

Moreover, as in other countries putting one’s feet on a chair or table is considered to be a very impolite gesture. One may not transmit anything or point at anything with their feet. For example, Chinese usually avoid moving baggage with their feet when standing in a queue at the airport. It is believed that such actions with feet are characteristics of animals.

It is worth noting that the perceptions mentioned above are widespread not only in China but in many other parts of Asia. You should never touch any part of someone else’s body with your foot when being there. If you accidentally do this, you should apologize by touching your hand to the person’s arm and then touching your own head.

Please comment and share your thoughts.

 

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